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Next Make CPW USB Gadget

I just got some PCBs in the mail!  These are the PCBs I designed for Next Make's Campus Preview Weekend (CPW) event later this April.  CPW is when all the MIT admitted students are invited to come check out the campus and see what life at MIT is like.  Generally all the student groups on campus throw fun events for the prefrosh - and Next Make is no exception!

This year, prospective students of the class of 2016 will be able to solder up and take home a cute USB gadget at the Next Make event:





The board plugs into a usb port and pretends to be a usb keyboard - it can then "type" a message into the computer it's plugged into, without having to install any drivers (inspired by an Instructable USB PCB business card that types out a guy's resume).  You can program any message you want into it (up to about 1000 characters).  Here's a video of it in action:




The board is based on the ATTiny45 with V-USB (software USB library) which lets the device show up as a low speed USB device.  If I have some free time, I may program alternate firmware that emulates a USB mouse and sends random mouse movements at random intervals as a prank device like ThinkGeek's Phantom Keystroker.

The PCB designs are on github: https://github.com/scottbez1/nextmake-cpw2012

Looking forward to CPW!

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